Tahini Cinnamon Rolls with Rose Frosting

Ordinary cinnamon rolls these are not. Nutty, rich tahini helps to keep these rolls from being overly sweet, and a rose-infused milk brings floral notes to the creamy frosting. The slight tang from sourdough starter adds depth and balances sweet and savory flavors. Topped with a blend of toasted black and white sesame seeds, coarse sugar, crushed rose petals, and flaky salt for crunch and subtle reinforcement of the flavors present. Garnishes like this add visual interest and textural contrast, but they also offer the lucky eater a hint of what they're in for.

Ordinary cinnamon rolls these are not. Nutty, rich tahini helps to keep these rolls from being overly sweet, and a rose-infused milk brings floral notes to the creamy frosting. The slight tang from sourdough starter adds depth and balances sweet and savory flavors. Topped with a blend of toasted black and white sesame seeds, coarse sugar, crushed rose petals, and flaky salt for crunch and subtle reinforcement of the flavors present. Garnishes like this add visual interest and textural contrast, but they also offer the lucky eater a hint of what they're in for.

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Sourdough Chocolate Chunk Cookies with Hazelnuts

These soft-baked cookies offer the perfect balance of sweet, salty, chocolatey, and tangy thanks to the use of sourdough starter. When developing a sourdough starter, a big portion must be thrown away during each daily feeding and this recipe helps to repurpose some of that flavorful, nutrient-dense starter in another way. Chopped hazelnuts, flaky sea salt, and coarse sugar provide crunch to these fluffy, cake-like cookies.    Recipe    200g AP flour  155g whole wheat flour  60g whole wheat rye flour  1g baking powder  1g baking soda  218g salted butter, softened  185g sugar  160g light brown sugar  238g sourdough starter  4g vanilla   1 large egg  285g semisweet chocolate chunks  50g toasted hazelnuts, chopped  flaky sea salt and coarse sugar for sprinkling       Method    Preheat oven to 475F degrees. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.  Cream together the softened butter and both sugars with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment until light and fluffy, scraping down the sides if necessary.  Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, whisk together all of the flour, the baking powder, the baking soda, and the salt.  Add the sourdough starter to the creamed butter and slowly incorporate using the "stir" setting until well combined, then add the in the egg and vanilla and beat on low  speed until smooth.  Add in the flour mixture and, using the stir setting again, slowly incorporate the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Add in the chocolate chunks and chopped hazelnuts and stir until just combined.  Using a 1.5oz cookie scoop, scoop the dough onto prepared cookie sheets about 1 1/2" apart. Sprinkle with a little flaky salt and a big pinch of coarse sugar. Bake cookies for about 14-16 minutes on the middle rack until just golden on the bottom. 

These soft-baked cookies offer the perfect balance of sweet, salty, chocolatey, and tangy thanks to the use of sourdough starter. When developing a sourdough starter, a big portion must be thrown away during each daily feeding and this recipe helps to repurpose some of that flavorful, nutrient-dense starter in another way. Chopped hazelnuts, flaky sea salt, and coarse sugar provide crunch to these fluffy, cake-like cookies.

Recipe

200g AP flour

155g whole wheat flour

60g whole wheat rye flour

1g baking powder

1g baking soda

218g salted butter, softened

185g sugar

160g light brown sugar

238g sourdough starter

4g vanilla 

1 large egg

285g semisweet chocolate chunks

50g toasted hazelnuts, chopped

flaky sea salt and coarse sugar for sprinkling

 

Method

Preheat oven to 475F degrees. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.

Cream together the softened butter and both sugars with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment until light and fluffy, scraping down the sides if necessary.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, whisk together all of the flour, the baking powder, the baking soda, and the salt.

Add the sourdough starter to the creamed butter and slowly incorporate using the "stir" setting until well combined, then add the in the egg and vanilla and beat on low  speed until smooth.

Add in the flour mixture and, using the stir setting again, slowly incorporate the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Add in the chocolate chunks and chopped hazelnuts and stir until just combined.

Using a 1.5oz cookie scoop, scoop the dough onto prepared cookie sheets about 1 1/2" apart. Sprinkle with a little flaky salt and a big pinch of coarse sugar. Bake cookies for about 14-16 minutes on the middle rack until just golden on the bottom. 

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Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Recipe    5 Meyer lemons, washed  Sugar  Demerara Sugar       Method    Place a few small plates in the freezer.  Halve the Meyer lemons lengthwise, then slice into 1/8" thick segments (try to remove all of the seeds and tougher membranes as you do this.)   Measure the sliced lemons in a measuring cup. You should have about 4 cups of sliced fruit at this point, but the more important part is that you use equal amounts of fruit, water, and sugar by volume, so just adjust the amount based on how much fruit you have. Use equal parts demerara sugar and white sugar.  In a medium pot, bring the sliced fruit and water to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until fruit is very tender (a good judge is if you can cut through the skin with a wooden spoon.) Add the sugar and return to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes.  After 30 minutes, take a plate out of the freezer and dollop a small spoonful of marmalade onto the plate. Tilt the plate to check the viscosity. It should be thick and jammy and not runny. Continue to simmer the mixture if it is too thin.  Cool before serving or storing. Marmalade will last about a month in the fridge.

Recipe

5 Meyer lemons, washed

Sugar

Demerara Sugar

 

Method

Place a few small plates in the freezer.

Halve the Meyer lemons lengthwise, then slice into 1/8" thick segments (try to remove all of the seeds and tougher membranes as you do this.) 

Measure the sliced lemons in a measuring cup. You should have about 4 cups of sliced fruit at this point, but the more important part is that you use equal amounts of fruit, water, and sugar by volume, so just adjust the amount based on how much fruit you have. Use equal parts demerara sugar and white sugar.

In a medium pot, bring the sliced fruit and water to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until fruit is very tender (a good judge is if you can cut through the skin with a wooden spoon.) Add the sugar and return to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, take a plate out of the freezer and dollop a small spoonful of marmalade onto the plate. Tilt the plate to check the viscosity. It should be thick and jammy and not runny. Continue to simmer the mixture if it is too thin.

Cool before serving or storing. Marmalade will last about a month in the fridge.

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Meringues

Meringues: the most innocent little treat there ever was

Meringues: the most innocent little treat there ever was

These are flavored with just a touch of almond extract (which is pretty much the best scent in the entire world) and bake up slightly golden due to the use of organic cane sugar, which is not snowy white like it's more processed counterpart.

These are flavored with just a touch of almond extract (which is pretty much the best scent in the entire world) and bake up slightly golden due to the use of organic cane sugar, which is not snowy white like it's more processed counterpart.