Bergamot Curd

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To put it simply, bergamot is like a *special orange*. It delivers notes of lemon, orange, and Meyer lemon all in one punch. Making citrus curd in the food processor allows you to use more of the peel and gives you the chance to infuse the essential oils of the citrus into the sugar, making for a more intensely flavored curd. 

Recipe

1-2 large bergamots, washed

3/4 cups sugar

115g unsalted butter, cut into pieces

100g egg yolks (from 5 large eggs)

Method

Peel the bergamot with a vegetable peeler. Place in a bowl with the sugar and toss to combine, let this sugar mixture sit for 5-10 minutes (this macerates the peel and releases the oils in the citrus).

Juice the bergamot to get 1/2 cup of juice (115g). 

Add the sugar mixture to a food processor and pulse until the peel is very finely chopped. Add the bergamot juice, butter, and egg yolks and pulse for about 45 seconds. (At this point, the mixture will look very curdled, but this is normal).

Cook the mixture over medium-low heat, whisking constantly to prevent the egg from cooking unevenly, for about 10-12 minutes or until very thick and opaque.

Strain the curd into a bowl with a fine mesh strainer to remove the bergamot peel and any coagulated egg to ensure your mixture is super smooth. 

Place a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the curd and refrigerate until chilled. 

Serve the bergamot curd with a dollop of whipped cream, pile onto a crisp pavlova, or layer it into cakes.

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Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Recipe    5 Meyer lemons, washed  Sugar  Demerara Sugar       Method    Place a few small plates in the freezer.  Halve the Meyer lemons lengthwise, then slice into 1/8" thick segments (try to remove all of the seeds and tougher membranes as you do this.)   Measure the sliced lemons in a measuring cup. You should have about 4 cups of sliced fruit at this point, but the more important part is that you use equal amounts of fruit, water, and sugar by volume, so just adjust the amount based on how much fruit you have. Use equal parts demerara sugar and white sugar.  In a medium pot, bring the sliced fruit and water to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until fruit is very tender (a good judge is if you can cut through the skin with a wooden spoon.) Add the sugar and return to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes.  After 30 minutes, take a plate out of the freezer and dollop a small spoonful of marmalade onto the plate. Tilt the plate to check the viscosity. It should be thick and jammy and not runny. Continue to simmer the mixture if it is too thin.  Cool before serving or storing. Marmalade will last about a month in the fridge.

Recipe

5 Meyer lemons, washed

Sugar

Demerara Sugar

 

Method

Place a few small plates in the freezer.

Halve the Meyer lemons lengthwise, then slice into 1/8" thick segments (try to remove all of the seeds and tougher membranes as you do this.) 

Measure the sliced lemons in a measuring cup. You should have about 4 cups of sliced fruit at this point, but the more important part is that you use equal amounts of fruit, water, and sugar by volume, so just adjust the amount based on how much fruit you have. Use equal parts demerara sugar and white sugar.

In a medium pot, bring the sliced fruit and water to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until fruit is very tender (a good judge is if you can cut through the skin with a wooden spoon.) Add the sugar and return to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, take a plate out of the freezer and dollop a small spoonful of marmalade onto the plate. Tilt the plate to check the viscosity. It should be thick and jammy and not runny. Continue to simmer the mixture if it is too thin.

Cool before serving or storing. Marmalade will last about a month in the fridge.

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